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Enjoy the beauty of the Eiffel Tower

Enjoy the beauty of the Eiffel Tower

Enjoy the beauty of the Eiffel Tower

 

The Eiffel Tower is a wrought-iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.

Constructed from 1887 to 1889 as the entrance to the 1889 World's Fair, it was initially criticised by some of France's leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France and one of the most recognisable structures in the world.[3] The Eiffel Tower is the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015.

The tower is 324 metres (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building, and the tallest structure in Paris. Its base is square, measuring 125 metres (410 ft) on each side. During its construction, the Eiffel Tower surpassed the Washington Monument to become the tallest man-made structure in the world, a title it held for 41 years until the Chrysler Building in New York City was finished in 1930. Due to the addition of a broadcasting aerial at the top of the tower in 1957, it is now taller than the Chrysler Building by 5.2 metres (17 ft). Excluding transmitters, the Eiffel Tower is the second tallest free-standing structure in France after the Millau Viaduct.

The tower has three levels for visitors, with restaurants on the first and second levels. The top level's upper platform is 276 m (906 ft) above the ground – the highest observation deck accessible to the public in the European Union. Tickets can be purchased to ascend by stairs or lift to the first and second levels. The climb from ground level to the first level is over 300 steps, as is the climb from the first level to the second. Although there is a staircase to the top level, it is usually accessible only by lift.

 

How to Tell the Difference Between Shrimp and Prawns

When it comes down to their biology, both shrimp and prawns are decapods, meaning they’re crustaceans with 10 legs.

Shrimp, the more petite crustacean, live in saltwater. To tell if your crustacean is a shrimp, there are a few small but distinguishing details to look for. Shrimp have claws on two of their legs, and the second segment of their shell overlaps the first and third shell segments. This also gives a distinct bend to their shape, another detail to watch for when seafood shopping.

Prawns live in fresh or brackish (somewhat salty) water, often near the bottom. These crustaceans have claws on three of their legs, which you can spot if you purchase your seafood unpeeled. Prawns' shell segments overlap down their abdomen (first overlaps second, second overlaps third), meaning there's less of a distinct bend in their body.

A good rule of thumb to differentiate between the two is size, as prawns are typically larger than shrimp. If you really want to know what crustacean you purchased without making a trek out on a shrimp boat, just check the shell. If the second segment overlaps the first and third, you’ve got a shrimp; if the segments overlap down the abdomen, you’ve got a prawn.

Can You Taste the Difference?

Does this mean you need to run to the fridge and inspect the shell of every little crustacean before your next shrimp boil? No need! Culinary-wise, the flavors of the two have no major distinguishing factor, aside from prawns’ slightly sweeter taste. Prawns also tend to be more expensive than shrimp.

But overall, your purchase is more likely to be affected by the diet, habitat, and region of the seafood. Your energy is better spent on finding out where the product is sourced from as opposed to the minutiae of its taxonomy. Wild-caught shrimp are best, as the majority of farmed shrimp comes from regions where regulations are limited.

Champs-Élysées

Champs-Élysées

Catch of the Day says Eric

Catch of the Day says Eric